Aaron Carter’s Team Shares Plan to Rehabilitate After Cause of Death Determined

The team of Aaron Carter, the late singer, has recently shared their efforts to implement a plan to rehabilitate him after the cause of his death was determined. Carter died in 2020 due to a combination of drug and inhalant intoxication, according to the autopsy report.

The team, which included his mother, Jane Carter, and his brother, Nick Carter, had been trying to get him help for years. They had tried to get him into a rehabilitation program, but he was unable to commit to it. Jane Carter said that she had been trying to get him help since he was a teenager, but he was always resistant to it. She said that she was devastated when she heard the news of his death.

Nick Carter also shared his thoughts on the situation, saying that he had been trying to get his brother help for years. He said that he had tried to get him into a rehabilitation program, but Aaron was never able to commit to it. He said that he was heartbroken when he heard the news of his death.

The team’s efforts to get Aaron help were unsuccessful, but they hope that by sharing their story, they can help others who are struggling with addiction. They want to raise awareness about the dangers of drug and inhalant abuse, and to encourage people to seek help if they are struggling.

The cause of Aaron Carter’s death was determined to be a combination of drug and inhalant intoxication. According to the autopsy report, he had a high level of oxycodone in his system, as well as a high level of benzodiazepines. He also had a high level of alcohol in his system.

The team of Aaron Carter had been trying to get him help for years, but he was unable to commit to a rehabilitation program. His family hopes that by sharing their story, they can help others who are struggling with addiction and encourage them to seek help.

Source: E! News

Further reading: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. (2020). Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Retrieved from https://www.samhsa.gov/data/sites/default/files/reports/rpt29393/2020NSDUHFFRPDFWHTML.pdf

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